TOP Myths about gymnastic: BUSTED!

There are some goods things in life that aren’t for anyone, but right now we can’t name even one...

Ok, ok, for example, our age for professional gymnastics, we are all over 30, so the Olympics shouldn’t count on us.

But for kids, things look completely different. It only takes the child desire to do it and usually it’s be more than enough.

But, most of the time, parents are the ones who worry more than the case and keep the child from an activity that would be very valuable in the child future development. So, let’s stop worry and see first if we have a realistic reason to do so.

Gymnastics sounds a very special and specific activity, so most of the parents consider, from different perspectives, that their child is not well enough equipped to sustain such a physical activity.

Today we want to bust the most used clichés myths about gymnastics!

 

Myth #1 My child is not talented

Busted: Not all people who participate in gymnastics are Olympians. Gymnastics is not only for an elite! In fact, most don't even compete! Children will be attracted by the this spectacular activity and will be more motivated to put effort in it, and no doubt the reward will come soon.

 

Myth #2 My child does not have a certain body type

Busted: It doesn’t have to have a specific body type. There is long gone the time when for ballet, for example, you shouldn’t be taller than 1.60. Now, the most well paid ballerinas in the world are the tallest ones.

Same in gymnastics. Any one can participate in gymnastics regardless of size and strength. And, as learning readiness (strength and flexibility) improve, more advanced skills can be achieved.

Myth #3 Gymnastics stunts your growth

Busted: If that would be true, it would mean that playing basketball makes you taller. The genetic is the primary factor here. It was not the ballet that kept ballerinas short, it was the theatres decision to choose short ballerinas because they were much easier to be lifted by their partners. For the same reason, regarding the easiness of movement and the high probability of performance, the clubs chosen fragile features.   

 

Myth #4 My child is too old to start gymnastics

Busted: We can’t believe that this is still an obstacle, we tell kids as young as eight or nine that they are “too old” to start a sport. If it doesn’t imply professional performance or going to Olympics it doesn’t mean you can do it. So, start finding a club with older beginners and pursue the dream, because it’s possible. such clubs are quite many.

 

Myth #5 My child would have poor academic performance

Busted: We were saying in a previous article exactly the contrary and we will say it again to bust it once and for all. Gymnastics provides a great way for children to use their brains and their bodies. To be precise in a certain movement, the child will have to use the body strength and the concentration in the same time.

Nerve cells multiply, promoting healthy brain function and strengthening brain connections. The cognitive requirements of gymnastics will carry over into the classroom. Your child might be able to focus better in school when gymnastics is a part of her life. There are multiple studies that suggest that children who are physically fit perform better in the classroom and that gymnastics specifically may boost reading scores.

 

Myth #6 Gymnastics is too dangerous for my child!

Busted: When a gymnastics program is tailored to the needs of the age group and ability level it is not dangerous. In fact, learning gymnastics actually prevents injuries by teaching students how to control their bodies more safely. When you watch gymnastics on TV it does look like it has a dangerous element because the sport rewards danger and risk with higher points. But these athletes are trained and learn how to perform these skills safely through years of practice with hours in the gym daily.

Gymnastics provides a great sense of safety because participants are taught early how to fall and land correctly, which is an important part of every sport.

 


Older Post Newer Post